Fireflyer

This page features content from BIONICLE Generation 1

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From BIONICLEsector01

"Left alone, the small insects were relatively harmless. But when a swarm was angered, they would pursue an enemy halfway across the city."
— Narrator, The Darkness Below

Fireflyer
Noimage.png
Rahi
Conservation status Unknown
Known locations Ta-Metru (formerly)
Artidax (formerly)
Spherus Magna



Fireflyers are small insectoid Rahi.

History

The Fireflyer species was created by the Makuta using Viruses and Liquid Protodermis as one of the Rahi to inhabit the Matoran Universe.[1]

In Metru Nui, swarms of Fireflyers could be found mainly in Ta-Metru, nesting in the furnaces and maintenance tunnels.[2]

When the Toa Metru were traveling through the Fikou Web, the Rahi named Krahka used her mimicking powers to become a Rahkshi of Insect Control. She then attacked Nokama by using her powers to summon a swarm of Fireflyers to her aid, effectively defeating Nokama.[3]

While on Artidax searching for Makuta Miserix, a team sent by the Order of Mata Nui encountered sands that attempted to suck Spiriah into their depths. Roodaka mutated these sands into Fireflyers, freeing the trapped Makuta.[FoF, Ch. 7]

After the Great Spirit Robot was critically damaged in the Battle of Bara Magna, many Fireflyers emigrated from the Matoran Universe to Spherus Magna.[citation needed]

Abilities and Traits

Fireflyers travel in large swarms. They are able to fly and each possess a stinger. They are harmless when unprovoked, but if disturbed, they can become aggressive and will chase their target for long distances.[2] They are called Fireflyers because their stings[3] cause so much pain that the victim feels as if they are on fire.[OGD]

Appearances

Books Comics Online

Novels

Guides

BIONICLE

Story Serials

References

  1. "The Makuta." BIONICLE: Makuta's Guide to the Universe, p. 63.
  2. 2.0 2.1 "Ta-Metru." "Fireflyers." BIONICLE: Metru Nui - City of Legends, p. 51.
  3. 3.0 3.1 "Chapter 3." BIONICLE Adventures 3: The Darkness Below, p. 36.